Bolivia

Bolivia is a beautiful, geographically diverse, multiethnic, and democratic country in the heart of South America. It is surrounded by Brazil to the northeast, Peru to the northwest, Chile to the southwest, Argentina and Paraguay to the south. It shares with Peru control of Lake Titicaca (Lago Titicaca), the world’s highest navigable lake (elevation 3,805m).

Sometimes referred to as the Tibet of the Americas, Bolivia is one of the most “remote” countries in the western hemisphere; except for the navigable Paraguay River stretching to the distant Atlantic, Bolivia and Paraguay are the only two landlocked nations in the Americas. It is also the most indigenous country in the Americas, with 60% of its population being of pure Native American ancestry.

HOW TO GET THERE

Air travel is the obvious way to get to Bolivia, the main airports are located in La Paz to the western side of the country and in Santa Cruz to the east. The arrival plan must be based mostly in the purpose of your visit to the country; you have to remember that La Paz receives most of their visitors due to the immense culture and heritage from the Incas and other indigenous cultures from the Andean region, and therefore from La Paz it is easier to move to the Tiwanaku ruins, Oruro’s carnival,Potosí’s mines, Uyuni, Lake Titicaca, Los Yungas valley and the Andes Mountains;

It is common for tourists to travel through a land border at the north-east of Chile/ South-West of Bolivia.

Keep in mind that only about 5% of all the roads in Bolivia are paved. However, most major routes between big cities such as Santa Cruz, La Paz, Cochabamba and Sucre are paved. A 4×4 is particularly required when off the flatter altiplano. Be aware that in mountainous regions traffic sometimes switches sides of the road. This is to ensure the driver has a better view of the dangerous drops.

An international Driving Permit (IDP) is required but *most* times EU or US driving licences will be accepted. There are frequent police controls on the road and tolls to be paid for road use.

WHAT TO DO AND WHAT TO SEE THERE

Bolivia is rich with history and amazing lakes and highlands. This is the place where those who enjoy in hikes will have some of the most amazing hiking trails with some breathtaking view.

The Death Road (North Yungas Road including the old section): from La Cumbre to Coroico. A mountainbike tour of 64km where you’ll be able to see the diversity of Bolivia. Leave from La Cumbre at 5000mts, in a cold and windy environment, and get to Coroico, in a wet and tropical environment. You can take an organized tour with one of the companies (i.e. Downhill Madness) from La Paz or ride it on your own bike. If you ride on your own, be very careful (ride down in-line one after another, keep safe distance from the rider in front of you, slow down before the turns), use a good mountain bike (at least with front shock absorber), helmet. If you take the tour, you’ll get the equipment, instructions and guiding, but you probably won’t be allowed to stop to take pictures wherever you want.

Explore the Provinces: Bolivia is a place to explore; it is mostly still untouched. The people are friendly in the countryside. There are hundreds of off the map, mostly out-of-the-guide places to go in Bolivia, and far more exciting than what the tour agencies and guide books offer. In the La Paz department for example you can easily catch transport to places like Pelechuco, the east side of Lake Titicaca, Achacachi, Isla del Sol, or Quime… not to mention scores of other villages and small towns. The free govt. tour agencies at the Plaza Estudiantes or Prado can help you find transport anywhere and tell you about it.

If you enjoy dining in the restaurants and you enjoy in the food Bolivia is perfect place for you because they have some nice food.The cuisine of Bolivia might be called the original “meat and potatoes” — the latter (locally calledpapas from the Quechua) were first cultivated by the Inca before spreading throughout the world. The most common meat is beef, though chicken and llama are also easily found. Pork is relatively common. Deep frying (chicharron) is a common method of cooking all sorts of meat, and fried chicken is a very popular quick dish; at times the smell permeates the streets of Bolivian cities. Guinea pigs (cuy) and rabbits (conejo) are eaten in rural areas, though you can sometimes find them in urban restaurants as well. A common condiment served with Bolivian meals is llajhua, a spicy sauce similar to Mexican salsa.

Walking around the cities is also pleasant and you can enjoy in a great view of colonial architecture some Inca ruins and modern style city malls shopping centers and etc.

 

NOTE

Coca leafs are all over the place you can chew them and thats gave you a bit stimulate and is wide spread thing in Bolivia but still don`t have any contact with cocaine due is illegal in Bolivia

20-jpg

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

lapaz-bolivia-nigh_3463661b