Ancient Tourism- Top 10 ancient sacred places

From Pyramids in South America via Stonehenge and Kokino in Europe to Egypt pyramids and Petra city in Jordan ancient ruins always atract people to visit them. Energy that is there is special and unique expirience is to be there. We show you some of them here.

1.COPAN – HONDURAS

Copán is an archaeological site of the Maya civilization located in the Copán Department of western Honduras, not far from the border with Guatemala. It was the capital city of a major Classic period kingdom from the 5th to 9th centuries AD.Has typical structure for Mayan cities, great orginize place with typical pyramid.

Copan

 

2.ALTUN HA – BELIZE

Altun Ha  is the name given to the ruins of an ancient Mayan city in Belize, located in the Belize District about 30 miles north of Belize City and about 6 miles west of the shore of the Caribbean Sea.Altun Ha was a wealthy ceremonial center boasting two main plazas, thirteen structures (including the Temple of Sun God or the Temple of the Masonry Altars). Altun Ha is not very far from the Caribbean Sea and it formed part of a unique cultural zone along with other coastal sites. There are also no stelae at Altun Ha but the discovery of rich tombs indicates that the ruling elite enjoyed access to substantial amounts of exotic goods.

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3. KOKINO – MACEDONIA

Kokino is a Bronze Age archaeological site in the Republic of Macedonia, approximately 30 km from the town of Kumanovo, and about 6 km from the Serbian border, in the Staro Nagoričane municipality. According to NASA this observatory is 4 000 years old and is 4th oldest in the world. In the area are found many things that indicate that was civilization living in that area 6-7000 years ago. Kokino is precise observatory that follow Lunar calendar phases exactly and very precise

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  1. GOBEKLI TEPE – TURKEY

Göbekli Tepe  is an archaeological site at the top of a mountain ridge in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of modern-day Turkey, approximately 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of Şanlıurfa. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (984 ft) in diameter.[4] It is approximately 760 m (2,493 ft) above sea level.

The tell includes two phases of ritual use dating back to the 10th – 8th millennium BCE. During the first phase, pre-pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and a weight of up to 20 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the PPNB-period. Younger structures date to classical times.

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  1. KARAKORUM – MONGOLIA 

The site of Karakorum may have been first settled about 750. In 1220Genghis Khan, the great Mongol conqueror, established his headquarters there and used it as a base for his invasion of China. In 1267 the capital was moved to Khanbaliq (modern Peking) by Kublai Khan, greatest of the successors of Genghis Khan and founder of the Mongol (Yüan) dynasty (1206–1368) in China. In 1235 Genghis Khan’s son and successor, Ögödei, surrounded Karakorum with walls and built a rectangular palace supported by 64 wooden columns standing on granite bases. Many brick buildings, 12 shamanistic shrines, and two mosques were once part of the city, which also was an early centre for sculpture, especially noteworthy for its great stone tortoises.

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  1. EASTER ISLAND – PACIFIC OCEAN

Easter Island is situated in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, and was one of the primary islands of the Polynesian Island group. Hundreds of stone statues or ‘Maoi’ lie scattered around the island, and encircle it on long raised platforms. The island poses several questions in regards pre-Columbian contact with the Americas.

The small, isolated nature of the island led many to suggest that this may have led to the eventual implosion of tribal activity on the island, which culminated only shortly before its discovery by the Dutch in 1772. Recent studies however suggest that the islanders were masters of their environment and the collapse actually occurred ‘following’ European contact.

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  1. VISOKO – BOSNIA 

Underneath the layers of vegetation covering the hills in Visoko, there are layers of concrete making up what is known as the Bosnian Valley of the Pyramids.

One of the Bosnian Pyramids, the Pyramid of the Sun, is approximately one third taller than the ancient Egyptian Great Pyramid. The Pyramid of the Sun is constructed of five thick layers of concrete (sandstone slabs, almost one meter thick for each layer), with each layer containing a fifteen centimeter layer of clay in between. Underneath the concrete and clay, the inner pyramid consists of sandstone blocks

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  1. SOUTH AFRICA 

Something amazing has been discovered in an area of South Africa, about 150 miles inland, west of the port of Maputo. It is the remains of a huge metropolis that measures, in conservative estimates, about 1500 square miles. It’s part of an even larger community that is about 10,000 square miles and appears to have been constructed — are you ready — from 160,000 to 200,000 BCE

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  1. MACHU PICCU – PERU

Machu Picchu is an Incan citadel set high in the Andes Mountains in Peru, above the Urubamba River valley. Built in the 15th century and later abandoned, it’s renowned for its sophisticated dry-stone walls that fuse huge blocks without the use of mortar, intriguing buildings that play on astronomical alignments, and panoramic views. Its exact former use remains a mystery.

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10.CHICHEN ITZA – MEXICO

 

Chichén Itzá is a world-famous complex of Mayan ruins on Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula. A massive step pyramid known as El Castillo dominates the 6.5-sq.-km. ancient city, which thrived from around 600 A.D. to the 1200s. Graphic stone carvings survive at structures like the ball court, Temple of the Warriors and the Wall of the Skulls. Nightly sound-and-light shows illuminate the buildings’ sophisticated geometry.

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